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Megadeth's Dave Mustaine Endorses Rick Santorum

Frontman wants a Republican in the White House

February 15, 2012 12:30 PM ET

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Dave Mustaine of Megadeth performs during The Big 4 Festival in Indio, California.
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Megadeth frontman Dave Mustaine says he hopes former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum is our next president. Mustaine, who once covered the Democratic National Convention for MTV (back in 1992), told Music Radar he wants a Republican president and disagrees with music industry colleagues who say President Obama is doing a good job.

"I don't think so," said the veteran headbanger. "Not from what I see."

He has questions about Mitt Romney's extreme wealth, he said, and his interest in Newt Gingrich has waned. "He's just gone back to being that person that everybody said he was – that angry little man," Mustaine said. "I still like him, but I don't think I'd vote for him."

Santorum, who kept his hopes alive last week by winning GOP primaries and caucuses in Missouri, Minnesota and Colorado, "has some presidential qualities," said Mustaine. Though he admitted he was "completely oblivious" about the candidate earlier in the primary season, he was impressed when Santorum left the campaign trail to spend time with his ailing daughter.

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