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McVie Returns With "Meantime"

Former Fleetwood Mac keyboardist to release third album

April 5, 2004 12:00 AM ET
Christine McVie will release In the Meantime, her first set of new songs since departing Fleetwood Mac, on July 27th. Meantime is only the singer/keyboardist's third solo release in her almost four-decade career, and it's the follow-up to a self-titled album issued two decades ago.

McVie's return contradicts comments from her former Mac mates who said that she had left the music business altogether and retreated to her home in the U.K. Because Fleetwood Mac's 2003 release Say You Will included some material from the mid- and late-Nineties, McVie's keyboards were heard on a couple of the songs, but according to drummer Mick Fleetwood, McVie "retired" because "she doesn't want to be in this business anymore. Her heart was in the music always, but she didn't have her heart in what comes with it." The group released the album as a four-piece and toured without McVie.

McVie's departure followed a tenure of more than three decades with Fleetwood Mac, to which she contributed several of its Top Forty hits including "You Make Loving Fun" and "Say You Love Me." Christine McVie spawned a pair of hits itself, with "Got a Hold on Me" breaking the Top Ten and "Love Will Show Us How" going Top Forty in 1984.

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