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Massive's 3D Busted for Porn

Robert Del Naja free after questioning on porn, drug charges

February 27, 2003 12:00 AM ET

Massive Attack frontman Robert Del Naja is denying ever having looked at child pornography on the internet after his arrest in connection with alleged class A drug and Web porn offenses.

British police raided his Bristol, England, home Tuesday as part of Operation Ore, the same international child pornography sting that netted Who guitarist Pete Townshend last month. They came away with computer equipment and substances suspected to be drugs, and detained Del Naja for six hours of questioning. Del Naja, who records and performs with Massive Attack as 3D, has not yet been charged, and is now free pending further inquiries.

In Britain, Class A drugs include ecstasy, cocaine, methadone, heroin, L.S.D., and amphetamines. Possession can carry a seven-year prison term. A conviction for possession of child pornography could carry a five-year sentence.

"I am fully cooperating with police and I would ask everyone not to judge me prematurely," Del Naja said after his release. "I have total faith in the justice system."

Massive Attack's latest album, 100th Window, is currently in the U.K. Top Ten, and Del Naja has recently been an outspoken public opponent of the possibility of war with Iraq.

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