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Mary J. Blige Considering 'Rock of Ages' Role

R&B singer would play strip-club owner

November 30, 2010 2:25 PM ET

The latest musical luminary to be affiliated with the upcoming film version of the Rock of Ages musical might raise a few eyebrows: Mary J. Blige.

Citing "spies," Vulture is reporting that the Queen of Hip-Hop Soul "is all in" to take on the role of Justice Charlier, owner of the show's exotic-dance venue the Venus Club. Tom Cruise's proposed starring role in the film reportedly also remains under discussion, although he is now said to be considering the role of bad-guy singer Stacee Jaxx instead of club owner Dennis Dupree.

Blige might seem like a left-field choice, but she's been inching into rock territory in recent years. She covered U2's "One" with Bono on her 2005 LP The Breakthrough, and, more surprisingly, earlier this year she teamed up with Travis Barker, Steve Vai and others for a cover of Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" that aired on Idol Gives Back — and Blige managed to take liberties with Robert Plant's melody and delivery without deviating too far from the original.

Mary J. Blige in Talks to Join Rock of Ages Movie [Vulture.com]

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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