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Mark Ronson Welcomes Rhymefest, Phantom Planet at Lollapalooza

August 4, 2008 1:00 AM ET

Mark Ronson and company marked the final date of their 16-month tour in funky style. The English guitarist/deejay had a host of international guests in tow — ncluding Liverpool's Candie Payne, Australia's Daniel Merriweather and all of Phantom Planet — and treated a small but fervent crowd to "a bunch of covers of indie-rock songs with trumpets on [them], blah blah blah." A horn section and string section — each dolled up in ballroom attire — manned opposite sides of the stage while Ronson, looking all of 14 years old, inhabited the roles of master of ceremonies and rhythm guitarist. Getting a little help from their friends, they turned the Kaiser Chiefs' "Oh My God" and Radiohead's "Just" inside-out. Ronson's lone misstep? Putting Rhymefest out to open rather than close the show. The dynamic Chicago emcee smoldered on an "innerversion" of Britney Spears' "Toxic" and leapt into the audience on "Brand New," during which he free-styled verses while surfing atop the crowd.

More Lollapalooza Coverage: Rock 'N' Roll Diary

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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