.

Madonna Stalker Escapes Mental Health Facility

Man once threatened to murder the singer

February 10, 2012 8:30 AM ET
Robert Dewey Hoskins listens as he is sentenced to 10 years in prison for stalking Madonna.
Robert Dewey Hoskins listens as he is sentenced to 10 years in prison for stalking Madonna in 1996.
POOL/AFP/Getty Images

A man who was convicted of stalking Madonna in the Nineties has escaped a mental health facility in California. According to Los Angeles police, Robert Dewey Hoskins walked away from the facility unnoticed and remains at large. Police have described him as highly psychotic and violent when not taking his medication.

Hoskins, 54, was sentenced to 10 years in jail in 1996 after being arrested for scaling a wall around the pop icon's home in Hollywood and threatening to slit her throat. Hoskins had told the singer's bodyguard that she was meant to be his wife and that if could not have her, he would kill her. After he was released from prison, he was arrested again in July of last year and was sent to another mental health facility in Norwalk, California.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com