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Madonna Signs Three-Album Deal With Interscope

Pop icon's new label will coordinate with her Live Nation deal

December 14, 2011 2:50 PM ET
madonna
Madonna attends the gala screening of her film 'W.E.' in London.
CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images

Madonna has signed a three-album deal with Interscope in which she will earn a base of $1 million per record. The pop star's pact with Interscope and the Universal Music Group will work in tandem with her 10-year multi-rights "360" deal with Live Nation, the promoter of her top-grossing Sticky and Sweet tour in 2008. Madonna signed that deal in 2007, and the promoting giant had always intended to partner with a label to release new music.

Madonna's first album for Interscope, expected to arrive sometime in 2012, will be the star's first record for a company other than Warner Bros., her label of 25 years.

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