.

Madonna Replaces Swastika in Video Image of French Politician

Singer swaps question mark for Nazi symbol at France show

August 23, 2012 1:20 PM ET
Madonna
Madonna
Tony Barson/WireImage

Madonna has removed the swastika superimposed over an image of right-wing French politician Marine Le Pen from a video played during shows on her European tour, The New York Times reports.

The video that contained the image – as well as other political and religious figures including Pope Benedict XVI, Sarah Palin and Chinese President Hu Jintao – accompanied Madonna on the song "Nobody Knows Me." When she performed the track Tuesday in Nice, France, the video depicted Le Pen's face with a question mark over it instead.

"It's proof that our arguments won out," Gaël Nofri, the leader of a Nice-based conservative group that supports Le Pen's National Front Party, told Agence France-Presse. "It's excellent news." 

The National Front party has spoken out several times about the picture of Le Pen, which preceded an image of Hitler with a swastika superimposed in the same position on his face. At one point the party threatened to sue Madonna, with vice president Florian Philippot saying, "We cannot accept this insulting connection. Marine Le Pen is defending her honor, but also that of party members and supporters and the millions of Front National voters."

Madonna defended her use of the image in an interview with a Brazilian television journalist, saying that it fit her message about "the intolerance that we human beings have for one another." She added: "Music should be about ideas, right? Ideas inspire music."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com