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'Mad Men' Pulls Dusty Springfield Song from Season Premiere

Critics complained it wasn't released when episode takes place

Dusty Springfield and the cast of 'Mad Men.'
David Redfern/Redferns and Frank Ockenfels/AMC
March 20, 2012 8:45 AM ET

Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner has pulled Dusty Springfield's 1967 hit "The Look of Love" from the show's fifth season premiere after television critics complained that the tune was not released until six months after the events of the episode took place. "We have replaced this song with one more suited to the time period and you, along with our audience, will hear it for the first time during our March 25th broadcast," Weiner wrote in a statement to critics.

"Although we take license for artistic purposes with the end-title music, we never want the source music to break from the time period we are trying to recreate," Weiner wrote. "As someone who has a deep appreciation for details, I want to thank you for bringing this to our attention."

Though the music in Mad Men generally sticks to period music from the Sixties or earlier, there is some precedent for breaks from chronology in the music used in the show. For example, the season six episode "Maidenform" featured a montage set to the Decemberists' "The Infanta," a song that would not be recorded and released until 2005.

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