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M.I.A. Samples Blur, Says Documentary Is Back On

Singer posts 'Unbreak My Mixtape' ahead of new album

M.I.A. performs in Chicago.
Roger Kisby/Getty Images
August 21, 2013 10:25 AM ET

M.I.A.'s tense year is finally coming together. After recently threatening to leak her new album, Matangi, the singer has posted a new track called "Unbreak My Mixtape." The woozy, airy track samples Blur's "Tender" and Karen Dalton's "I Love You More Than Words Can Say" and includes emotional vocals from M.I.A. "How can I stand by you if I can't find my feet?" she sings.

Must-Hear Albums for Fall 2013: M.I.A., 'Matangi'

The singer's stalled documentary about Matangi also appears to be back on, according to the M.I.A.'s Twitter. "We grindin, we still choppin," M.I.A. wrote, giving no details. Her label, Roc Nation, pulled a teaser trailer for the documentary last month, prompting the film's director, Steve Loveridge, to quit the project. Loveridge was frustrated with slow pace of the documentary and leaked the trailer, but Roc Nation took quick action with a copyright claim.

The long-delayed Matangi had been pushed back from an expected April release, but no new date had been set, prompting M.I.A. to take a jab on Twitter last month at her label, Interscope. In turn, the record company announced Matangi would be out November 5th.

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