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Loretta Lynn Recalls the Civil War on 'Take Your Guns' - Song Premiere

Country crooner covers 150-year-old staple

July 24, 2013 9:00 AM ET
Loretta Lynn
Loretta Lynn
Douglas Mason/Getty Images

This fall, ATO Records will release a two-disc compilation of songs from the Civil War called Divided and United that will feature contributions from Old Crow Medicine Show, A.A. Bondy, Taj Mahal, T. Bone Burnett, Steve Earle, Dolly Parton and more. Now you can take an exclusive first listen to country icon Loretta Lynn's rendition of "Take Your Guns and Go, John," a sparse, somber song about a soldier leaving for war. Lynn imbues the track with a contemporary air that doesn't overwhelm its still-powerful, 150-year-old ache.

500 Greatest Albums of All Time: Loretta Lynn, 'All Time Greatest Hits'

"I had such a great time recording this song for this album," Lynn tells Rolling Stone. "I loved the song and sound of that banjo, played by Bryan Sutton, made me feel I was back on the front porch in Kentucky where I came from. Glad to be a part of this record."

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