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Lorde Is Giving Dave Grohl Hope for the Future of Pop Music

"When I first heard 'Royals' it was sandwiched between all of that other stripper pop," he says. "I was so relieved"

April 25, 2014 10:00 AM ET
Lorde
Lorde performs in Indio, California.
C Flanigan/FilmMagic

Dave Grohl vividly remembers the first time he heard Lorde. "I was driving," he says. "My two daughters, Violet and Harper, who are eight and five years old, started singing along. I was so happy and relieved that my two girls were singing a popular song on the radio that had some substance and depth, which I considered to be healthy for them as kids. I know that sounds kind of parent-ish."

The Inside Story Of Nirvana's One-Night-Only Reunion

The Foo Fighters frontman isn't a fan of most Top 40 music. "When I first heard 'Royals' it was sandwiched between all of that other stripper pop," he says. "I was so fucking relieved. I thought, 'Hey, this might be another revolution.' When I met her I said, 'When I first heard your song on the radio and my kids sang along I felt like there was hope for my kids to grow up in an environment which is more than just superficial.'"

When he decided to bring in a group of female singers to front Nirvana at the Hall of Fame, he had little doubt that Lorde would fit in perfectly. "There's something about her that represented or resembled the Nirvana aesthetic," he says. "She has an incredible future ahead of her as a writer, performer and vocalist."

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

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Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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