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Lonely Forest Weigh Contrasts on 'Lovric's' – Song Premiere

Track comes from new LP, 'Adding Up the Wasted Hours'

Lonely Forest
Stefan Elmer
October 3, 2013 9:00 AM ET

In anticipation of the Lonely Forest's fourth album, Adding Up the Wasted Hours, the widely heralded, Washington-based indie rock foursome previews their latest with "Lovric's." Coming on the heels of the group's first single, "Warm/Happy," this piano-steered winner makes a big impression, offering a soaring hook as it unfolds.

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"'Lovric's' serves as a great song to epitomize and condense a lot of the bi-polar lyrical and musical themes on Adding Up the Wasted Hours," singer John Van Deusen tells Rolling Stone. "Gentle and loud, clarity and confusion, conviction and apathy, etc. . . . I don't think it's too difficult to grasp the references to relational excitement, separation anxiety and sexual timidity that we tried to get across in the lyrics and instrumentation. I guess at the end of the day this record is all about trial and error and 'Lovric's' is an adequate introduction."

As with its predecessor, Arrows, the Lonely Forest recorded their latest with Death Cab for Cutie's Chris Walla and will release the album through his Trans label on October 15th (it's available for preorder here). In support of Adding Up the Wasted Hours, the band will launch a month-long headlining tour in Nampa, Idaho, on October 10th. Check their website for the complete itinerary.

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