.

Lollapalooza Cancelled

Tour was to feature Morrissey, Pixies and more

June 22, 2004 12:00 AM ET
Poor ticket sales have prompted the cancellation of this year's Lollapalooza tour. The festival was to visit sixteen venues starting July 15th in Auburn, Washington, with two dates of different music for each stop. But facing potential losses of millions of dollars, organizers pulled the plug.

Morrissey, Sonic Youth, PJ Harvey, the String Cheese Incident, the Flaming Lips, the Pixies, Wilco, Modest Mouse and the Polyphonic Spree were among the more than thirty bands scheduled to take part in the tour.

"My heart aches along with the bands, and all our employees, whose hard work developed one of the most exciting tours this nation was to see," organizer Perry Farrell said. "My heart is broken."

The news comes amid reports that the summer concert industry is suffering from tepid sales. Though Eighties icons like Prince and Madonna have fared well, tours by Fleetwood Mac and the Dead have yet to catch fire. Organizers were hoping that Lollapalooza's broad-based list of performers and modest ticket price would draw a substantial audience.

"I am in utter disbelief that a concert of this stature, with the most exciting lineup I've seen in years did not galvanize ticket sales," co-founder Marc Geiger said. "Concert promoters across the country are facing similar problems."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com