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Listen to the Replacements' First Show in 22 Years

The band tears through 23 cuts in this blistering 75-minute set

August 27, 2013 1:25 PM ET
Paul Westerberg
Paul Westerberg of The Replacements performs in Toronto, Canada.
Dustin Rabin

The Replacements made a big return this weekend at Toronto's Riot Fest, where they performed 23 songs in their first show in 22 years. The punk band's spirited comeback set has now surfaced online through the Replacements Live Archive Project, with the entire 75-minute show available to stream.

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Original members Paul Westerberg and Tommy Stinson, along with drummer Josh Freese and guitarist David Minehan, tore through classic cuts like "Takin' a Ride," "Tommy Gets His Tonsils Out," and "Hangin' Downtown" as well covers of Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" and Sham '69's "Borstal Breakout." The set also featured "Everything's Coming Up Roses," a Broadway song they recorded for last year's Songs for Slim EP.

Fans who missed out can still catch the Replacements at future Riot Fest dates; they'll play Chicago on September 15th and Denver on September 21st.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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