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Listen to Kings of Leon's 'Mechanical Bull'

Rockers stream new album on iTunes a week before release

Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performs in Chelmsford, England.
Neil Lupin/Getty Images
September 17, 2013 12:15 PM ET

Kings of Leon's new album Mechanical Bull is streaming in its entirety on iTunes, a week before its official September 24th release.

The LP is the band's first since 2010's Come Around Sundown and follows the resolution of inter-band tension brought about by singer Caleb Followill walking offstage during a show in Dallas in July 2011 and the subsequent cancellation of the rest of the band's tour.

The Night That Tore the Kings of Leon Apart

When the foursome reconvened for Mechanical Bull they did so in their new studio in their hometown of Nashville, teaming up with longtime producer Angelo Petraglia.

In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, Nathan Followill spoke about the back-to-basics recording process for Mechanical Bull: "In November of last year, we started kicking ideas around in this shitty-ass place we bought that we turned into a studio," he said, adding it was the first time the band hadn't written new material while on tour. "This record, we had to go back to the blueprint of what we did on our first album, when we locked ourselves in a house and rolled the dice."

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