.

Lindsey Buckingham's Return to Rock

The Fleetwood Mac leader crafts upbeat new disc, preps tour with the band

October 2, 2008
Fleetwood Mac, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood, rolling stone archive, old, photo, Lindsey Buckingham, John McVie
Lindsay Buckingham performs the opening night of his concert tour in support of his "Gift of Screws" release at the Mountain Winery on September 7th, 2008 in Saratoga, California.
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty

In 2001, Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham had the intention of recording a solo album, but then his band showed up. "They said, 'Let's do a studio album!' " says Buckingham. "So the bulk of that material was folded into [2003's] Say You Will." Three years later, Buckingham finally struck out on his own with Under the Skin, a moody collection that highlights his virtuosic finger-picking. On September 16th, Buckingham released a far more rocking sequel: Gift of Screws, named after an Emily Dickinson poem, is a wide-ranging collection of 10 songs he's written over the past decade. "I told the band that I wanted to be left alone for three years," he says, "so I could follow through with my plan: to put out two albums and to tour behind them."

The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time: Lindsey Buckingham

The past 10 years have been particularly joyful for Buckingham. "There was a period where I was leading a fairly narrow life, focused exclusively on music," he says. "The past decade has been a revelation to me. Meeting my wife and having three beautiful children has infused another level of enthusiasm and optimism. You can get a sense of that in the new work." While the new disc displays the intensity that marks much of his solo work, there are moments of uncomplicated joy, such as the buoyant opener, "Great Day." And when John McVie and Mick Fleetwood join in on the galloping "Wait for You" and "The Right Place to Fade," you'll be transported to Fleetwood Mac's heyday.

After touring to support Screws through October, Buckingham will reunite with his bandmates again next spring for a tour. In March, Sheryl Crow announced plans to collaborate with the band, but Buckingham says the idea never moved beyond a casual conversation. "If you're bringing someone in just to do Christine McVie's stuff," he adds, "doesn't that sort of degrade it into kind of a lounge act?"

This story is from the October 2nd, 2008 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Long Walk Home”

Bruce Springsteen | 2007

When the subject of this mournful song returns home, he hardly recognizes his town. Springsteen told Rolling Stone the alienation the man feels is a metaphor for life in a politically altered post-9/11 America. “Who would have ever thought we’d live in a country without habeas corpus?” he said. “That’s Orwellian. That’s what political hysteria is about and how effective it is. I felt it in myself. You get frightened for your family, for your home. And you realize how countries can move way off course, very far from democratic ideals.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com