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Levon Helm Documentary, 'Ain't in It for My Health,' Premiering in April

Film will open in New York, followed by showings in select cities

Levon Helm performs in North Adams, Massachusetts
Douglas Mason/Getty Images
April 1, 2013 5:25 PM ET

The documentary Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm will make its U.S. theatrical debut on April 19th, the first anniversary of Helm's death. The film will premiere at Cinema Village in New York before showing in select cities.

Elton John, Mumford & Sons Lead Tribute to Levon Helm at Grammys

Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm followed the singer-drummer and longtime member of the Band as he wrote and recorded his 2010 album Electric Dirt. Director Jacob Hatley shot the documentary over two years, starting as Helm released his 2007 album, Dirt Farmer, his first studio album in 25 years. "Jacob was the perfect fly on the wall for many months as we experienced the ups and downs of a wonderful time in all our lives," said musical director and longtime Helm collaborator Larry Campbell in a statement.

Helm died on April 19th, 2012 in New York of throat cancer. He was 71.

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“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

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