.

Leonard Cohen, Drake, Feist Nominated for 2012 Polaris Awards

Japandroids, Grimes, the Weeknd, Fucked Up also vying for Canadian honor

June 15, 2012 12:15 PM ET
Leonard Cohen
Leonard Cohen during the 2012 Awards for Lyrics of Literary Excellence in Boston
Marc Andrew Deley/Getty Images

The Polaris Awards have announced their long list for 2012, including Leonard Cohen's Old Ideas, Drake's Take Care and Feist's Metals among the nominees. Also up for the award are Japandroids' Celebration Rock, Grimes' debut album Visions, the Weeknd's Echoes of Silence, Fucked Up's David Comes to Life, Patrick Watson's Adventures in Your Own Backyard and the Handsome Furs' final album, Sound Kapital.

The Polaris Awards honor the Canadian Album of the Year, with the artist receiving a $30,000 prize. Judgments are made regardless of genre or sales by a jury of over 200 members of the Canadian music media, focusing on artistic merit only. The Polaris short list will be unveiled July 17th,and the winner will be announced at the Polaris gala on September 24th. For the full list of 2012 Polaris Awards nominees, visit the official website.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com