Legendary Rock Photographer Jim Marshall's Estate Starts Fellowship

The photographer behind many of rock's most iconic images honored at UC Berkeley

Jim Marshall poses at his home in San Francisco, California on February 14th, 2010. Credit: Denise Truscello/WireImage/Getty

Jim Marshall was one of rock's greatest photographers, capturing countless iconic moments both onstage and backstage throughout the Sixties and Seventies, from Jimi Hendrix burning his guitar at the Monterey Pop Festival to Johnny Cash flipping the bird at San Quentin.

To pay tribute to the photographer, who passed away in March 2010, the Center for Photography at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism has joined with Marshall’s estate to launch the Jim Marshall Fellowships in Photography, with a goal of raising $500,000 to $1 million for the school's visual arts programs.

In addition to the fellowships, Marshall's work has been on display at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism since February as part of an exhibit that will run through May. Titled "The Haight: Love, Rock and Revolution," taken from the recently released photography book of the title, the exhibit focuses on Marshall's work photographed during San Francisco's Summer of Love, including images of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Jefferson Airplane.

In February, the exhibit held a kickoff party featuring longtime San Francisco music critic and Marshall friend Joel Selvin and Amelia Davis, a photographer and Marshall assistant, with both discussing the legendary photographer's work. For more info on the Jim Marshall exhibit and the fellowship, visit the UC Berkeley site for more details.