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Lea Michele Leaves It All on the 'Battlefield'

'Glee' star drops the second single from forthcoming album, 'Louder'

December 29, 2013 5:56 PM ET
lea michele the x factor
Lea Michele performs on FOX's 'The X Factor' season 3 finale in Hollywood, CA.
Ray Mickshaw/FOX via Getty Images

Glee star Lea Michele dropped her second single this weekend, releasing the heartrending song "Battlefield" from her forthcoming album, Louder.

While keeping with the martial imagery of "Cannonball," which Michele released on December 10th, "Battlefield" leaves behind the easy pop beat in favor of a ballad examining the end of a fading relationship. A stark backing piano accompaniment pushes Michele's searing vocals to the frontlines as she sings, "It's easy to fall in love, but it's so hard to break somebody's heart. What seemed like a good idea has turned into a battlefield."

Is Setting Out for New York City the Right Move for 'Glee'?

Michele's debut album is due out on March 4th. In the meantime, her show Glee is in the midst of its fifth season as the show grapples with the sudden death of actor Cory Monteith, Michele's real-life boyfriend. The show is set to return with new episodes on February 25th. Michele's character, Rachel Berry, is reportedly going to be the focus of a new Glee spin-off from creator Ryan Murphy.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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