.

Lawsuit: Bob Dylan Strikes Back at Bootleggers

Dylan sues record pressing plant over copies of bootleg 'Great White Wonder' LP

Bob Dylan giving a press conference
Chris Wood/Express/Getty Images
December 27, 1969

Vancouver — Bob Dylan is suing a record pressing plant here for making and distributing the bootleg Great White Wonder LP which contains a number of unreleased Dylan cuts.

Asked whether they were in fact doing the bootlegging or had anything to say about the suit, a spokesman for the firm, International Corporation Ltd., said she "doesn't have anything to say." Neither did their attorneys.

Also named in the suit are Pat Allistair and Dub Taylor, who are said to have taken the album to International for copying. It is uncertain whether they are the same two men who were distributing the Great White Wonder in Los Angeles, prior to taking it on the lam to Canada, but probably so.

Some 10,000 copies of the double-record set were printed in Vancouver, and sold for prices from $6.95 to a top of $12. The album is a big underground item throughout the U.S.

Dylan is asking that they and the pressing plant be restrained from getting out any more albums — and also demands a full accounting of sales, plus any other master recordings they may control. The suit does not seem to involve damages or any share of the profits.

This story is from the December 27th, 1969 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Madame George”

Van Morrison | 1968

One of the first stream-of-consciousness epics to make it onto a Van Morrison record, his drawn-out farewell to the eccentric "Madame George" lasted nearly 10 minutes, combining ingredients from folk, jazz and classical music. The character that gave the song its title provoked speculation that it was about a drag queen, though Morrison denied this in Rolling Stone. "If you see it as a male or a female or whatever, it's your trip," he remarked. "I see it as a ... a Swiss cheese sandwich. Something like that."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com