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Lauryn Hill Celebrates Prison Release With New Single 'Consumerism'

Rapper rails against 'compromised commercialism' and more

Lauryn Hill performs in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images
October 4, 2013 12:00 AM ET

After serving a three-month sentence for tax evasion, Lauryn Hill is being released from prison later today and is marking the occasion with a new single called "Consumerism." 

Hill speed-raps through a laundry list of societal ills over a chaotic rhythm that's more Death Grips than "Killing Me Softly." Her pointed voice brutally targets "corporate greed in Jesus’ name," decrying ageism, sexism, racism, fascism, "compromised commercialism" and "neo-McCarthyism."  

Where Does Lauryn Hill's 'The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill' Rank on Our 100 Best Albums of the Nineties?

Hill's release follows a controversial three-month sentence for failing to file tax returns on over $2 million in income over a two-year period beginning in 2005. Leading up to her incarceration, she cited historical racism as one of the bigger reasons for her tax woes. On a brighter note, she recently inked a deal with Sony and a new record is reportedly in the works. 

Stream "Consumerism" below: 

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