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Lana Del Rey: 'I Wish I Was Dead Already'

Singer reveals dark thoughts in recent interview

June 12, 2014 6:50 PM ET
Lana Del Rey
Lana Del Rey
Neil Krug

Lana Del Rey wants to die so badly, she wishes she was already dead, or so she told British newspaper The Guardian. When the subjects of Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse came up during her interview, and the newspaper connected the two by their deaths, Del Rey – whose breakthrough album was titled Born to Die, she proclaimed her death wish. "I don't want to have to keep doing this, but I am," she told the paper. And by "this," she said she meant "everything." "That's just how I feel," she said. "If it wasn't that way, then I wouldn't say it. I would be scared if I knew [death] was coming, but. . . " The rest of the sentence did not make it into print.

Lana Del Rey's Odd 'Summertime Sadness' Success

Another deceased musician also became a topic of discussion, but in a more personal way to Del Rey. The singer claimed that prior to his death in 2013, former Velvet Underground frontman Lou Reed had expressed an interest in working with her, and she wrote the hipster satire "Brooklyn Baby," which she recorded for her upcoming album Ultraviolence, with him in mind. Del Rey said that he was so serious that she made the effort to try to meet up with him. "I took the red eye, touched down at 7 a.m.," she told the paper, "and two minutes later, he died."

These pallid revelations comes shortly after Del Rey revealed to Fader that she had been suffering what she called a "medical anomaly that doctors couldn't figure out" in early 2013. "That's a big part of my life," she said. "I just feel really sick a lot of the time and can't figure out why."

The track list for Ultraviolence reveals a number of songs that deal specifically with sadness with titles like "Cruel World," "Sad Girl" and "Pretty When You Cry." She also recently shared the title track, which contains morose turns of phrase like, "He used to call me poison, like I was poison ivy." The record is due out June 17th.

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