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Lana Del Rey: 'Feminism Is Just Not An Interesting Concept'

The singer has also shared the title track of her forthcoming album, 'Ultraviolence'

June 4, 2014 2:40 PM ET
Lana Del Rey
Lana Del Rey
Jeff Vespa/Getty Images for The Weinstein Company

Update: Lana Del Rey has also released the title track of her forthcoming album, Ultraviolence, which is streaming below.

Lana Del Rey opened up in a recent interview, denouncing feminism and discussing a mystery illness that afflicted her while touring in support of her 2012 debut Born to Die. Regarding her views on gender equality, she told Fader, "For me, the issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept. . . Whenever people bring up feminism, I'm like, god. I'm just not really that interested." She went on to say, "I'm more interested in, you know, SpaceX and Tesla, what's going to happen with our intergalactic possibilities."

Lana Del Rey's Odd 'Summertime Sadness' Success

When asked more about her feelings on feminism, she defined the word. "My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants." And when the interviewer followed up that statement by asking her why she's often choked in her videos, she said, "I like a little hardcore love."

In the same interview, she revealed that she was battling an unknown illness when a fan in Dublin took video of her crying while singing her single "Video Games." "I'd been sick on tour for about two years with this medical anomaly that doctors couldn't figure out," she said. "That's a big part of my life: I just feel really sick a lot of the time and can't figure out why.

"I'd gotten these shots in Russia, where we'd just been," she continued. "It was just heavy. It's just heavy performing for people who really care about you, and you don't really care that much about yourself sometimes. I thought it was sad. I thought my position was sad. I thought it was sad to be in Ireland singing for people who really cared when I wasn't sure if I did."

On June 17th, Lana Del Rey will release her new album Ultraviolence, which contains a number of songs with titles that deal explicitly with sadness: "Cruel World," "Sad Girl," "Pretty When You Cry." She recorded some songs with the Black Keys' frontman, Dan Auerbach, as producer. In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, he said he was so impressed with her demos that he wanted to record her. "I didn't want to mess it up," he said. "She sang live with a seven-piece band. That's the whole record – a seven-piece band with her singing live. It was crazy."

She also shared the ethereal, chilly track "Ultraviolence" from the album. In the song, she sings sad lyrics like, "He used to call me poison, like I was poison ivy" – all the while professing her love to her "cult leader" – against a thick thatch of strings, piano and surf guitar. Listen to the track here:

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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