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Lana Del Rey Chosen for New Jaguar Ads

Automaker touts singer's 'blend of authenticity and modernity'

Lana Del Rey
Nicole Nodland
August 24, 2012 9:45 AM ET

First Lana Del Rey popped up in luxurious angora sweaters and tailored blazers as the face of H&M's fall advertising campaign, now thanks to Jaguar, she's got a car to match, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Del Rey is plugging the automaker's new two-seater F-Type, though you won't actually see the car: the sultry singer is very much the focus of the ads, which show her at the edge of a swimming pool in a sun hat and white bathing suit, and reclining on a chaise lounge (above).

"The allure of Jaguar is in large part due to its duality," Adrian Hallmark, Jaguar's global brand director, said in a statement. "She has a unique blend of authenticity and modernity, which are two values we believe are shared with Lana in her professional achievements."

The F-Style makes its debut at the Paris Motor Show in September. Del Rey's latest album, Born to Die, came out in January.

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