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Lambert Adds Hitmaker Max Martin to List of Collaborators

August 17, 2009 2:28 PM ET

Adam Lambert delivered some news about his November debut album via a giddy tweet this morning: "In NYC to record song with MAX MARTIN!!! Soo excited. This album is getting so great!!" Martin is the Swedish wunderkind responsible for Kelly Clarkson's mammoth "Since U Been Gone," Britney Spears' "... Baby One More Time," Pink's "So What" and "I Kissed a Girl" by Lambert's cape-wearing pal Katy Perry.

As Rolling Stone reported earlier this month, the American Idol runner-up has also locked down writing and/or recording sessions with OneRepublic's Ryan Tedder (Kelly Clarkson, Beyoncé), Lady Gaga producer RedOne, Linda Perry, Greg Wells and Sam Sparro.

Go behind the scenes of Lambert's RS cover shoot in exclusive photos.

Lambert told RS he completed a bunch of sessions before the American Idols Live tour launched in July, but the weeks following the tour's end — it wraps mid-September — will be packed with work on his as-yet-untitled debut. "I got a lot of co-writing done, some great initial vocal material recorded, and just general collaborations with different producers."

Check out photos of Lambert and the rest of Season Eight's Top 10 on tour.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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