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Lady Gaga, Elton John Record Song for Disney Movie

Hello, Hello' will appear in 'Gnomeo and Juliet,' coming to theaters in February

October 22, 2010 9:06 AM ET

Lady Gaga and Elton John, who teamed up to open the 52nd Annual Grammys back in January, have collaborated on a new song, "Hello, Hello." It will appear on the soundtrack for the animated Disney film Gnomeo and Juliet (and not on Gaga's upcoming album Born This Way), EW's The Music Mix reports. The film hits theaters February 11th, 2011. Gaga and John performed "Pokerface," "Speechless" and Elton's "Your Song" at the Grammys, and John has since been keen on working with Gaga on new music. "I'd love to [work with her] in the future," John recently told EW. "There's a chance I might do one track with her [for Born This Way], but it's just, she's so busy, and I'm so busy, we can never get together!"

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John, who is a producer on Gnomeo and Juliet, co-wrote the movie's soundtrack with composer James Newton Howard. He has contributed music to movies before — most notably with his Oscar-winning The Lion King soundtrack — "Hello, Hello" marks Gaga's first contribution to a film.

Photos: Random Notes

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

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Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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