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Lady Gaga Admits She Vomited Backstage at London Concert

Singer also says performing is like having sex with her fans

February 10, 2011 9:55 AM ET
Lady Gaga performs at 02 Arena on May 30, 2010 in London, England.
Lady Gaga performs at 02 Arena on May 30, 2010 in London, England.
Matt Kent/Getty

Pop superstar Lady Gaga explains in the new issue of Vogue that her dedication to live performance is completely steadfast -- in extreme sickness and in health.

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"I don't know if you knew this," she confides to writer Jonathan van Meter of a recent London concert. "But the other night, in London, I had food poisoning. I was vomiting backstage during the changes."

The singer, 24, boasts: "Nobody knew...I just Jedi mind-tricked my body. [I told myself] 'You will not vomit onstage.'"

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The star -- whose third album Born This Way drops next month -- had more than one reason for holding back. "I was also thinking, If I do, they are going to think I'm drunk. And I don't want them to think I am human, let alone drunk. I certainly wouldn't want them to think I had something so ordinary as food poisoning," Gaga says with a laugh.

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Yet at the same time, Gaga (real name: Stefani Germanotta) feels an intense, almost sexual kinship with her fans during her live shows.

"Sometimes, being onstage is like having sex with my fans," she says. "They're the only people on the planet who in an instant can make me just lose it."

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"I see myself in them," she adds of her quirky army of "Little Monsters." "I was this really bad, rebellious misfit of a person--I still am--sneaking out, going to clubs, drugs, alcohol, older men, younger men. You imagine it, I did it. I was just a bad kid. And I look at them, and every show there's a little more eyeliner, a little more freedom, and a little more 'I don't give a f*** about the bullies at my school.'"

"Speaking purely from a musical standpoint, I think I am a great performer," the superstar says. "I am a talented entertainer. I consider myself to have one of the greatest voices in the industry. I consider myself to be one of the greatest songwriters. I wouldn't say that I am one of the greatest dancers, but I am really quite good at what I do. I think it’s OK to be confident in yourself."

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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