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La La Brooks Vows 'What's Mine Is Yours' - Song Premiere

Singer from the Crystals steps into solo spotlight

October 10, 2013 8:30 AM ET
La La Brooks
La La Brooks
Jacob Blickenstaff

It's been 50 years since a teenage La La Brooks led the Crystals in their Phil Spector-produced hit "Da Doo Ron Ron," but the veteran singer hasn't lost her touch. On October 15th, Brooks will release her debut solo album, All or Nothing, on which she lays down originals and covers the Small Faces, the Ohio Untouchables and more. Here, Brooks digs her heels into "What's Mine Is Yours," draping her vintage girl-group vocals over luscious, shimmering guitars and jangly percussion.

Where Does the Crystals' 'He's a Rebel' Rank of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time?

"I loved doing 'What's Mine Is Yours' because it brought me back to recording with Phil Spector and his Wall of Sound. The lyrics and the melody reminded me of the Sixties," Brooks tells Rolling Stone. "And regarding this album, I'm so grateful; who would have thought that I'd be doing a full album at my age?"  Good things come to those who wait.

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