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Kurt Cobain Film 'Will Be This Generation's 'The Wall',' Director Hopes

Brett Morgen plans 'a mix of animation and live show'

Kurt Cobain circa 1991
Michel Linssen/Redferns
January 4, 2013 11:55 AM ET

Director Brett Morgen hopes the Kurt Cobain film he's been working on for years "will be this generation's The Wall," he told NME in an interview describing the ambitious scope of the project.

Courtney Love and the Cobain estate tapped Morgen to make a film examining the life of the late Nirvana frontman, and the project has started to come together after five years of planning. Morgen most recently helmed the Rolling Stones documentary Crossfire Hurricane.

100 Greatest Singers: Kurt Cobain

"If you think about Kurt, he's a contradiction. He could be sincere and sentimental, and also ironic and sarcastic," said Morgen. "He was sweet and sour. He was incredibly funny, too, and the film has to reflect his spirit."

Though Cobain's legacy centers around his music, Morgen hopes to shed some light on the rocker's other artistic pursuits. "The thing about him people might not know too is that he was an incredible visual artist and left behind a treasure chest of comic books, paintings, Super 8 films, all sorts," said Morgen, calling the film "a mix of animation and live action that'll allow the audience to experience Kurt in a way they never have before." Morgen hopes to release the film in 2014.

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