.

Kiss Hit the Studio for "Meat and Potatoes" Album With "Classic '70s Rock & Roll Vibe"

March 13, 2009 10:52 AM ET

The first studio album from Kiss in more than a decade will include songs "about the obvious things," says bassist-singer Gene Simmons, citing titles such as "Rotten To The Core." "No secret to life, no political messaging, nothing like that," he says of the lyrics.

As previously reported, Simmons confirms Kiss' first album since 1998's Psycho Circus will be produced by singer-guitarist Paul Stanley. "I don't have enough time to tie my shoelaces and there's nobody else I trust more than Paul," says Simmons, who's currently in Toronto to find three Canadian acts to sign to his recently resurrected Simmons Records, for which he has partnered with Universal Music Canada and businesswoman/former politician Belinda Stronach.

While he juggles all his other projects and pursuits, the band is also in the studio. The songs are all written, Simmons says. "There's nothing to prove to anybody. We're not interested in musical trends or anything else. We're too long in the tooth for that. So it's going to be sort of a classic '70s rock & roll vibe. Meat and potatoes. You know, sometimes you just want to go out and have a meat and potatoes thing [and] forget the French dressing."

Kiss — Simmons, Stanley, guitarist Tommy Thayer and drummer Eric Singer — will also continue touring for its 35th (now 37th) anniversary, beginning in South America in Santiago, Chile. Last year, the Kiss Alive/35 World Tour hit Europe, U.K., Australia, New Zealand and a few U.S. cities.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com