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Kings of Leon's "Fire" Battles the Rain at the "Today" Show

July 31, 2009 2:09 PM ET

 

 

 

Kings of Leon brought their fiery sex to the Today show this morning, performing in a light rain that swiftly became an unfortunate downpour. Their brief set featured "Use Somebody," "Notion" and "Sex On Fire" from the Followills' latest album, Only By The Night. As it was live TV after all, the band wasn't beyond a little pre-air primping (RS spied Caleb using someone's makeup mirror to fix his hair; he pushed his bangs around, curling and re-straightening them for a few minutes until he shrugged at his friend and gave up).

The most impressive homemade sign was a two-sided poster on a stick that featured a large black-and-white picture of lead singer Caleb backed by the four bandmembers' faces on "king" playing cards, one for each suit. In a brief interview with host Meredith Vieira in between songs, the Kings were compared with monsters of rock U2, to which Caleb responded, "Oh, wow, that's pretty big shoes to fill... we're still young. We've only had four albums, and I think we have, hopefully have a ways, a ways to go. It's a great compliment." Another song, after the jump:

 

 

 

Related Stories:
Kings in Their Castles: At Home With Kings of Leon
Kings of Leon's Family Album
All the Kings' Gems: 10 Essential Kings of Leon Tracks

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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