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Kid Rock's NAACP Award Sparks Controversy

NAACP members are boycotting decision to honor Rock because of his use of the Confederate flag on stage

March 11, 2011 5:40 PM ET
Kid Rock's NAACP Award Sparks Controversy
Frederick Breedon/Getty

Kid Rock is set to receive an award from the Detroit chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, but many members of the NAACP are protesting the group's decision to honor the singer. Rock, who will receive the organization's Great Expectations Award at the chapter's Freedom Fund dinner in May, is being criticized by several NAACP members for his frequent use of Confederate flag imagery in his concerts.

Photos: Kid Rock's Birthday Concert

Adolph Mongo, the head of Detroiters For Progress and a boycotting NAACP member, told the Detroit News that Rock's use of the flag is "a slap in the face of anyone who fought for civil rights in this country."

Photos: Backstage With Kid Rock

In an interview with the Guardian in 2008, Rock said that while he is aware of the flag's negative connotations, he mostly uses it to get across a certain attitude on stage. "To me it just represents pride in southern rock'n'roll music, plus it just looks cool," he said.

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