.

Kelly Clarkson Riled By Taylor Swift Defense That Slams "American Idol" Singers

February 4, 2010 12:00 AM ET

Taylor Swift's label head jumped to her defense today, telling the press Swift's Grammy-night performance may not have been note-perfect, but it captured why the 20-year-old is the "voice of a generation." Big Machine CEO Scott Borchetta went on to say, "This is not American Idol. This is not a competition of getting up and seeing who can sing the highest note. This is about a true artist and writer and communicator. It's not about that technically perfect performance."

His comments about Idol riled Season One champion Kelly Clarkson, who immediately responded in an open letter on her I Am Kelly blog. "Thank you for that 'Captain Obvious' sense of humor because you know what, we not only hit the high notes, you forgot to mention we generally hit the 'right' notes as well," Clarkson wrote. She signed her post "One of those contestants from American Idol who only made it because of her high notes." Clarkson has two Grammy wins under her belt, and songwriting credits on some of her biggest hits, including "Because of You" and "Already Gone."

Look back at the 2010 Grammys' big moments in photos.

Writing that she too has experienced off-nights in the post titled "Scott Borchetta" (just in case there was any confusion who it was addressed to), Clarkson added, "Instead of lashing out at other artists (that in your 'humble' opinion lack true artistry), you should simply take a breath and realize that sometimes things won't go according to plan or work out and that's okay." Swift — who recently toured with an American Idol contestant, Kellie Pickler — won four Grammys at Sunday night's ceremony, but news of her victories has since been overshadowed by criticism that she sang off-key during her three-song performance, which featured cameos with Stevie Nicks and Butch Walker.

Kelly Clarkson's journey from Idol to stardom.

Related Stories:
Taylor Swift's Label Lashes Out at Critics of Grammy Performance
Rolling Stone's Grammy Coverage
Beyonce, Taylor Swift Dominate 2010 Grammy Awards

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com