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Katy Perry Proves too Hot for 'Sesame Street'

Producers pull Perry's duet with Elmo, after parents complain that the singer was too provocatively dressed

September 23, 2010 1:30 PM ET

Katy Perry has proven too hot for Sesame Street: The show has decided not to air a reworked version of "Hot N Cold" that the singer did with Elmo because, according to TMZ, parents who saw the clip on YouTube found Perry's outfit too revealing. Earlier, Perry had called the duet "the highlight of my entire career." She added: "I think some of these songs, even though sometimes they have a naughty dimension to them, they are so pop infectious it gets into kids, just like whatever parents are saying around the house will get into kids, and I love that 'Hot N Cold' could translate to Sesame Street. I'm gonna have kids someday, and I love that some pop star out there is gonna change their lyrics to make my kids bounce in their diapers."

Katy Perry's Sexy Rolling Stone Cover Shoot

Said Sesame Street producers in a statement: "In light of the feedback we've received on the Katy Perry music video which was released on YouTube only, we have decided we will not air the segment on the television broadcast of Sesame Street, which is aimed at preschoolers."

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