.

After 20 Years, Kate Bush Gets Permission to Use James Joyce Text in Song

Singer has rerecorded 'The Sensual World' with Joyce's words as originally planned

April 5, 2011 8:50 AM ET
After 20 Years, Kate Bush Gets Permission to Use James Joyce Text in Song
Ellen Poppinga - K & K/Redferns/Getty

Kate Bush has been granted permission to use text from James Joyce's book Ulysses in a song over 20 years after requesting it. The singer had intended to use the words of Joyce's character Molly Bloom for the song "The Sensual World" from the 1989 album of the same name, but the writer's estate shot her down, forcing her to pen her own lyrics. The estate has apparently had a change of heart, and recently gave the singer permission to record the song as it was originally conceived.

Contest: Choose the Cover of Rolling Stone


The new version of "The Sensual World," now titled "Flower of the Mountain," will appear on Bush's forthcoming album Director's Cut. The record is a collection of reworked and rerecorded versions of songs from her albums The Sensual World and Red Shoes. The disc, Bush's first release since Aerial in 2005, is set to hit stores on May 16th.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“American Girl”

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers | 1976

It turns out that a single with "American" in its title--recorded on the Fourth of July during the nation's Bicentennial, no less--can actually sell better in Britain. Coupled with the Heartbreakers' flair for Byrds jangle and Animals hooks, though, is Tom Petty's native-Florida drawl that keeps this classic grounded at home. Petty dispelled rumors that the song was about a suicidal student, explaining that the inspiration came from when he was 25 and used to salute the highway traffic outside his apartment window. "It sounded like the ocean to me," he recalled. "That was my ocean. My Malibu. Where I heard the waves crash, but it was just the cars going by."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com