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Kanye West's Latest 'Dark Twisted Fantasy' Cover Revealed

A painting of a ballerina by George Condo will likely be one of the five covers for West's new LP

October 22, 2010 2:50 PM ET

One of Kanye West's five album covers for his forthcoming My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy LP was revealed after it was posted to a pre-order page on Amazon.com, and if the image — A George Condo painting of a ballerina dressed in a black tutu holding a martini glass — seems familiar, it's because the image was initially used as the artwork for the "Runaway" single before West instead chose an image of an actual ballerina.

Kanye West's Surprise Visit to Rolling Stone

West revealed that Dark Twisted Fantasy would include five different covers after his original cover — another Condo painting featuring a grotesque Kanye with a nude winged woman — was "banned" by powers unknown, or so Kanye claimed (a Wal-Mart rep said the company hadn’t seen the artwork). Kanye said that all five covers will be included within the copies of the album when it hits shelves on November 22nd.

Random Notes: Lady Gaga, Elton John, Kanye West

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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