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Kanye West Was Nervous to Propose to Kim Kardashian

Rapper discusses engagement and music with Ryan Seacrest

October 29, 2013 12:40 PM ET
Kanye West and Kim Kardashian
Kanye West and Kim Kardashian.
Michael Buckner/WireImage

Kanye West revealed today that he was nervous before he proposed to Kim Kardashian. "I was talking to a cousin, I said, 'What do you think she’s gonna say?'" he told Ryan Seacrest this morning on his radio show, On Air. "I'm not arrogant about love and feelings at all . . . I knew I wanted her to be my girl for a long time." He said he remembers first being smitten when he saw a picture of her with Paris Hilton. He recalled, "I told my boy, 'Have you seen that girl, Kim Kar-da-shon?'"

Find Out Why Kanye West Made Rolling Stone's List of the New Immortals

During the chat, the rapper revealed that the engagement ring was "four hours old" when he popped the question. West had been planning the proposal "for a while" and had been working with four different jewelers to make the perfect ring. When he finally got it, he put it in his bag until the time was right.

Planning that time, though, required some work, since he wanted to keep the proposal a secret. That's why, he said, he chose to do it on her birthday. "Anybody who came in thought it was a surprise party," West told Seacrest. "She knew I was going to do something for her birthday."

Now that Kardashian has accepted his proposal, the rapper says the couple have been giving a lot of thought to all things matrimonial. Kim will take West's last name. The rapper will wear a wedding band. Moreover, he says he'll be very involved in the planning of the wedding, saying he'd like to get the people who plan Chanel fashion shows to work on the ceremony.

Seacrest later brought up West and Kardashian's daughter, North, asking the rapper how he'll explain some of his artistic choices to her. "I haven't been a dad before," he said. "I don't strategize like that."

In addition to discussing parenthood and his impending nuptials, West also found time to discuss one of his favorite topics: himself. "People get really hung up in the way I word things," he said. "But I'm the best. That's the bottom line." Later, he explained his motivation. "God has blessed me," he said. "He's given me a focus. I want to design churches. My concern is doing God's work."

At another juncture he said, "The thing is, when you say 'I'm a creative genius,' people look at you like you're crazy . . . I've talked to people who have the power to let me go to the next level. They try to put you in a music box. At what point do you say, 'Yo, he might be like Walt Disney! He might be that creative!'"

As for West's own music, he said that he doesn't make records so much as projects. He said he usually has four or five projects at a time that serve as his main focus and that he has 10 or so other things "incubating." Of his most recent project, West said, "Yeezus was like a listening session to the world. It's like, 'Hey what do you think of this?'"

But while West makes no qualms about declaring himself the best, he doesn't believe he's infallible. "I'm not a perfectionist," he said at one point. Later he explained, "I am not really here to try to do perfected work. I'd rather challenge people." What's the closest the rapper has come to perfection? His 2010 release, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. "[That's] the closest thing to a perfected product. I know how to make perfection, I just don't." 

Additional reporting by Mike Ayers

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