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Kaiser Chiefs Celebrate Brotherhood on 'Bows and Arrows' - Premiere

Band's new anthem was recorded under a McDonald's

Kaiser Chiefs
Eoin McLoughlin
January 3, 2014 10:00 AM ET

On Kaiser Chiefs' "Bows and Arrows" – off their upcoming record Education, Education, Education and War – the Leeds indie-rockers put their new drummer, Vijay Mistry, in the spotlight. Mistry replaces founding member Nick Hodgson, who left the band in 2012, and he leads "Bows" with a vigorous hand, giving the song an aggressive base. Singer Ricky Wilson tops this with soaring lines about conflict and unity as guitarist Andrew White supplies a menacing, post-punk riff.

The Kaiser Chiefs Gear Up

"[Bassist] Simon Rix came up with the title when we were working in a studio under the McDonalds in Islington [London]. I liked the idea that bows and arrows are pretty useless on their own but when you get them together, they can be quite formidable," Wilson told Rolling Stone. "A bit like us lot, really. I love being in a band. It's daft to think you can do it alone. It's about not being afraid of emotion. It can be the strongest weapon we have. What's wrong with a load of blokes admitting they need each other? [It's] a sliver of hope through all the futility and loss on the record. You can also dance to it."

Education, Education, Education and War is out April 1st.

 

 

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