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Judge Dismisses Case Against Selena Gomez Stalker

Court rules 46-year-old man lacked 'specific intent' to frighten teen star

November 17, 2011 8:55 AM ET
selena
Selena Gomez hosts the MTV Europe Music Awards in Belfast, Ireland
Ian Gavan/Getty Images

A judge has dismissed the case against an Illinois man who was accused of stalking singer and actress Selena Gomez. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Edmund Clarke Jr. ruled yesterday that Thomas Brodnicki, 46, "lacked specific intent" to frighten Gomez. Brodnicki pleaded not guilty earlier this month to a single felony charge alleging that he had stalked the teenage star between July and October.

Gomez had been granted a restraining order against Brodnicki from another judge earlier this year. Court documents from that case reveal that Brodnicki claimed he spoke with God about harming the young pop star and traveled from Chicago to Los Angeles to meet her. Police were notified by mental health workers that Brodnicki had threatened to kill Gomez while he was on a psychiatric hold.

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