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Jon Stewart: Rallies Not a Response to Glenn Beck

Still, says Stewart, 'I'm less upset about politicians than the media.' Meanwhile, President Obama calls the idea of the Rally to Restore Sanity 'amusing'

September 30, 2010 9:30 AM ET

Jon Stewart says that his Rally to Restore Sanity — and Stephen Colbert's sister event, March to Keep Fear Alive — are not meant to counter Glenn Beck's Restoring Honor event of last August. "The march is like everything that we do, just a construct ... to translate the type of material that Stephen and I do" on The Daily Show and Colbert Report, Stewart said at a Q&A last night at New York's 92nd Street Y. Instead, the rallies are meant to satirize the political process, and the news coverage spawned from it. "I'm less upset about politicians than the media," Stewart, who was quoted by The Hollywood Reporter , said, adding that he "very much" wanted to avoid claims that his rally was a response to Beck's.

Obama in Command: The Rolling Stone Interview

The Rally to Restore Sanity and March to Keep Fear Alive will take place in Washington, D.C. on October 30th. (Halloween costumes will likely be involved.) "Think of our event as Woodstock, but with the nudity and drugs replaced by respectful disagreement; the Million Man March, only a lot smaller, and a bit less of a sausage fest; or the Gathering of the Juggalos, but instead of throwing our feces at Tila Tequila, we'll be actively not throwing our feces at Tila Tequila," goes a description on the Rally to Restore Sanity site.

Matt Taibbi: The Truth About the Tea Party

Conservative host Bill O'Reilly has declined Stewart's invitation to appear at his rally. President Barack Obama, meanwhile, said he was "amused" by the idea. Speaking to students yesterday about how the media has become "very splintered," with extreme tones from both conservative and liberal commentators, Obama said, "Jon Stewart, the host of The Daily Show, apparently he is going to host a rally called something like Americans in Favor of a Return to Sanity or something like that. And his point was, you know, 70 percent of the people, it doesn't matter what their political affiliation are, 70 percent of the folks are just like you, which is they're going about their business, they're working hard every day, they're looking after their families."

Gallery: Obama Through the Years

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Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
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