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Jon Bon Jovi Responds to Death Rumors

Posts cheeky photo on Facebook, jokes during concert

December 20, 2011 12:25 PM ET

Bon Jovi
Heaven looks a lot like New Jersey.
David Bergman/DavidBergman.net

Well, now Jon Bon Jovi knows for certain: he's wanted dead or alive.

Yesterday, rumors abounded on Twitter and Facebook about the Bon Jovi frontman's sudden death from cardiac arrest, apparently sourced from a blog post that reappropriated text from the Los Angeles Times' 2009 obituary of Michael Jackson. Bon Jovi debunked the false news with good humor, posting a merry photo on his official Facebook that read: "Heaven looks a lot like New Jersey" with the day's date. The photo was captioned, "Rest assured that Jon is alive and well! This photo was just taken."

Bon Jovi was clearly amused by the morbid gossip, referencing it often during his band's Monday night concert in New Jersey and pretending to take calls from concerned friends to verify his quite-alive status.

The singer's death hoax rounds out a year full of false celebrity death rumors. In February, Mick Jagger found himself the target of similar Twitter hysteria, with #RIPMickJagger trending for a day. Charlie Sheen faced several rounds of death reports this year, and Justin Beiber was rumored to have been killed in a car accident during the summer.

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