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John Fogerty's "Centerfield" Gets Honored by Baseball Hall of Fame

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Baseball's recent steroid scandal has been hard on old-school baseball enthusiasts like Fogerty. As a fan of the Oakland Athletics for the past couple decades, he has seen a pair of his favorite players — Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco — become the face of the sullied steroid era. "They were my icons, and I had no idea at the time," Fogerty says. "And then watching all this unfold, it's certainly in a clumsy way both of them have dealt with it. Very clumsy. It's just a lot better to own it. Come clean. Just say, 'I'm sorry I did it.'"

Before getting inducted into Cooperstown, Fogerty will perform to a much larger audience at Bonnaroo. But it's playing in front of a crowd full of Hall of Famers that really has him nervous. "I've met a few of my boyhood heroes already," he says, "and even though I am 65-years-old, I will turn into a 10-year-old. I've got a baseball and a pen and I'll say something like, 'Well, Mr. Ripken, can you sign my baseball?' And he'll be like, 'Oh, is it for your son?' And I'll say, 'No, it's for me.'"

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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