.

Joey Ramone's Record Collection Going Up for Auction

Sale also includes clothing, handwritten lyrics and his passport

Joey Ramone
Paul Bergen/Redferns
February 8, 2013 8:40 AM ET

Nearly 100 records owned by Joey Ramone are going up for auction online, along with some of his clothes, his passport, handwritten lyrics and his Rolodex, Billboard reports.

Starting February 14th, the estate of the Ramones singer will auction off a 97-title vinyl collection including albums by Cream, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, T. Rex, the Kinks, the Human League, Toots and the Maytals and Yes. There's a minimum bid of $500, and the auction continues through February 21st. 

Joey Ramone Through the Years

There are separate auction items for Ramone's passport, handwritten lyrics, two guitars he owned, a Rolodex containing music-business contacts and items of clothing, including a leather jacket, sunglasses and a lot of 140 of his t-shirts from bands including Nirvana and Motorhead, radio stations and locations. The auction runs through February 21st. All items include a letter of authenticity from the Joey Ramone Estate.

Ramone, whose real name was Jeffrey Hyman, died in 2001. The posthumous solo album . . . Ya Know? came out last year. 

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com