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Joey Bada$$ Rhymes on J Dilla Beat on 'Two Lips' – Song Premiere

Track will benefit late producer's music-ed foundation

Joey Bada$$
Blake Peterson
November 27, 2013 9:00 AM ET

"You could die in a second," Joey Bada$$ coolly observes on "Two Lips," a track that features a previously unused beat by the influential producer J Dilla, who died in 2006 of a rare blood disorder. Bada$$'s lyrical meditation on mortality matches up with a dusty drum sample and a dreamy backdrop from Dilla that evokes Stevie Wonder's late Seventies classics. 

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The song comes from a seven-inch being released in conjunction with Dilla's mother and Akomplice clothing to benefit the J Dilla Foundation, an organization that provides musical instruments and music lessons to underprivileged children. The B side of the single has J Dilla's original instrumental track for the song. "Working on this project alongside Akomplice and the J Dilla Foundation was a great success," Bada$$ tells Rolling Stone. "I thank both parties for allowing me to be a part of it and allowing me to use unreleased beats by my favorite producer of all time. It's a brighter day."

The release is available now on limited edition vinyl, and at Akomplice retailers starting November 29. Meanwhile, Joey Bada$$ is wrapping up his "Smoker's Club Tour."

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