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Jimi Hendrix Gets a Film

Brit producer John Marshall makes the Experience the first subject of a new pop series

Noel Redding, Jimi Hendrix and Mitch Mitchell
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
June 22, 1968

The Jimi Hendrix Experience has made a 30-minute color TV film incorporating some startling new techniques of visual presentation. The film, first in a new pop series by British producer John Marshall, created tremendous impact when it was screened for a group of international music executives at the Montreux Festivval, and was immediately sold for transmission in Scandinavia, Holland, Finland, Czechoslovakia and Poland. American, German and Japanese viewers may also experience the Experience, as negotiations are underway with their TV companies.

The second film, to be completed in June, stars the Incredible String Band, and the third will be "The Blues Scene in Britain." Extracts from the films as they are made will probably be regularly shown on the Who's autumn BBC-TV series, My Generation. Possible future subjects are the Kinks, Donovan and the Rolling Stones, with the strong possibility of some American rock groups as well.

This story is from the June 22nd, 1968 issue of Rolling Stone.

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