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Jenni Rivera Film Debut Still Slated For April Release

Family continues to hope that singer survived plane crash

Jenni Rivera
Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images
December 11, 2012 4:15 PM ET

The film debut of Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera, who died in a plane crash on Sunday, will still see a theatrical release in April as scheduled, Mashable reports. 

Rivera stars in Filly Brown as the incarcerated mother of the title character, an up-and-coming hip-hop artist about to score a lucrative record deal by possibly compromising her morals. You can watch the trailer for the film – which premiered at Sundance earlier this year – below.

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"Jenni Rivera was destined to surpass any artist that we have ever seen coming from the Mexican American culture," said the movie's producer, Edward James Olmos. "She was just starting." 

Rivera was one of seven people aboard the plane, which disappeared 10 minutes after it took off. Although a search team discovered the wreckage of a small plane in northern Mexico, during a press conference outside Rivera's mother's house, as reported by the Los Angeles Daily News, her family said they hoped she was still alive: "It's a 95 percent chance that she's dead, but we have that belief because we don't have a body," said Rivera's brother Pedro Rivera Jr. "They found clothes. They found shoes, but they didn't find any DNA."

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