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Jay-Z: Cristal Chief's Comments "Racist"

June 16, 2006 1:09 PM ET

Jay-Z's 40/40 Club in New York City will no longer be serving Cristal champagne. Hova's decision to boycott hip-hop's favorite beverage is a reaction to comments made by Frederic Rouzaud, the managing director of Louis Roderer Cristal, who told The Economist that he approached rappers' constant name-checking of the brand "with curiosity and serenity" and went on to say, "What can we do?" when asked if association with the rap lifestyle could hurt the brand. Rouzaud also said, "I'm sure Dom Perignon or Krug would be delighted to have their business." Jay-Z responded by saying, "I view his comments as racist and will no longer support any of his products through any of my various brands." The 40/40 Club will now be exclusively carrying Dom Perignon and Krug as its high-end champagnes. This morning Roederer responded to the rapper's comments by releasing this statement: "A house like Louis Roederer would not have existed since 1776 without being totally open and tolerant to all forms of culture and art, including the most recent musical and fashion styles which -- like hip-hop -- keep us in touch with modernity." Uh-huh.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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