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Jay-Z Becomes Spokesman for Duracell Powermat

Rapper will also invest in the company

January 11, 2012 8:45 AM ET
Jay-Z attends an announcement of his Carnegie Hall performances hosted by the United Way of New York City and the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.
Jay-Z attends an announcement of his Carnegie Hall performances hosted by the United Way of New York City and the Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation.
Theo Wargo/WireImage for United Way NYC and Shawn Carter Scholarship Foundation

Jay-Z has signed on as the spokesman for Duracell Powermat. The rapper, who may well be taking the gig to pay off a $1.3 million bill to rent out an entire floor of Manhattan's Lenox Hill Hospital for the birth of his and Beyoncé's daughter, Blue Ivy Carter, will also become an investment partner in the company.

"I believe in the future of wireless energy and I believe that Duracell Powermat is the company to bring on the revolution," Jay-Z said in a statement. "I'm partnering with Duracell Powermat because they're providing the solutions for the future."

Duracell struck a joint venture with Powermat in September to develop and produce wireless charging platforms for a variety of devices and environments, including charging stations for sports arenas. Perhaps not coincidentally, Jay-Z is a part-owner of the Nets basketball franchise, which is currently building a new arena in Brooklyn.

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